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Apple stock rose by about 1% on Monday despite warnings that the company’s next earnings report might disappoint. The iPhone maker is due to release its next earnings report in a couple of weeks. Of course, investors that are buying […] The post Apple Stock Remains Near Record High As Analysts Gear Up For Earnings appeared first on ValueWalk.

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New York's debt crisis is an incredibly important and little understood chapter in the evolution of what Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz calls market fundamentalism, a process the Trump administration is in the process of rapidly accelerating, which is why I was so happy to receive Kim Phillips-Fein's remarkable new book, "Fear City." In it, she meticulously documents how the remaking of New York City in the '70s was a prelude to what would become a global ideological tidal wave, one that has left the world brutally divided between the 1 percent and the rest. She helps us to
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MedEquities Realty Trust (MRT) is an attractive healthcare REIT that offers a big 7.2% dividend yield. It is growing rapidly, and it trades at compelling price-to-book and price-to-forward-AFFO ratios. And apparently, hedge funds like it too. This article provides an […] The post MedEquities Realty Trust: An Attractive 7.2% Yield appeared first on ValueWalk.

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You have to use the internet. Not just to read this story, but to live and work in the modern world. If that sounds highfalutin, that's because it is: Internet access is a human right, according to the UN, just like the right to own property, start a family and seek asylum. Privacy's on the list too, but the state of privacy on the internet is, well, on this week's Make Me Smart, Kai Ryssdal used the phrase "apocolyptically hosed." After our conversation with Joel Reidenberg, Molly Wood mentioned European privacy regulations, noting they're generally more consumer-focused than U.S. rules. "Who is the focus of these laws? Is it about protecting us, and giving us all the information we need and allowing us to make informed choices?" she asked. "Or is it about allowing Comcast to keep up with Google and Facebook when it comes to business models that rely on your personal data? I think that is a tension that's part of being American." That's more or less true, according to experts we talked with. Especially as new regulations spread through the European Union, privacy laws abroad are generally more comprehensive, easy to understand and consumer-friendly than the laws in the U.S.  "[They have] this idea that privacy is something that's quite central, that it could be thought of in terms of if property rights," said Indiana University associate professor Scott Shackelford, who teaches cybersecurity law. "Having privacy be the starting point and carving out free speech." The U.S. does the reverse, Shackelford said. Free speech is paramount, and privacy protections are carved out as exceptions. "You can see how both are valid in different ways, but they come to very different policy outcomes for sure," he added. We've pulled out a few examples: It's not a patchwork Americans' data are protected by a bunch of different regulations. The FCC is in charge of the rules concerning what data internet service providers, or ISPs, can and can't sell. Health data is protected under federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, or HIPAA. The Federal Trade Commission enforces the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act and cracks down on Instagram #sponcon. States have their own rules, too. It's an alphabet soup: messy and inconsistent. "The idea in the EU is you should have some control over your information," said Henry Farrell, an associate professor of political science and international affairs at George Washington University. "There is some variation in enforcement across specific sectors, but basic principles apply for whatever commercial sector you're in, so you don't have the same kind of patchwork of legislation you have in the U.S." Enforcement is getting more consistant Besides being spread out over a lot of different agencies, enforcement of American privacy laws changes wildly according to who's in office. Those FCC rules concerning ISPs and privacy data? The FCC voted them through at the very end of the Obama administration, last October. With control of the Senate and House, Republicans rolled them back just a few months later. The EU sees much smaller swings in policy as administrations change, Farrell said, because most member states aren't as polarized as the U.S. Still, enforcement is often a "black box," with inconsistent action from independent regulators. That will change as the new EU regulations roll out, Shackelford added. "There is going to be a one-stop-shop, basically kind of one regulator, one supervisory authority for all EU data privacy law," he said. "Which is going to be more efficient from the government perspective in Europe, and also for companies because they only have to deal with one entity across all 28 states. It's really remarkable they were able to agree to that, because that's not the case, for example, of the U.S. And we're one country." Europeans don't sweat the fine print (as much) We talked a lot on the podcast this week about the huge terms of service and privacy policies most people blindly agree to. Even Reidenberg, the privacy expert, told us he mostly skims when he's signing up for a new service. It's kind of a calculated risk: You kind of have to hope you're not blindly agreeing to tie your hands in a lawsuit or clear all your data to be bought and sold. It's even scarier when you consider apps like Instagram that attract a younger user base. Europeans have to sign similar stuff, but does it come with the same anxiety? "Not nearly the same way, and the reason is European privacy law mandates that businesses basically have to adhere to a sense of basic privacy principles with regards to the way that they use your data," Farrell said. "You know, the fact that there are certain things that they simply cannot do with your data. That is not true for U.S. consumers in the same way at all." Under the EU's new rules, you also have a lot more control over how and when your data moves between services you use. "If you switch from the equivalent of Comcast to U-Verse, Comcast has to get rid of all your search history when you switch if you request that," Shackelford said. "So then that's a big deal." Your data expires Much was made a few years ago about the "Right to Be Forgotten," an idea that lead Spanish authorities and later the European Court of Justice to scrub search results deemed “inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant, or excessive in relation to the purposes for which they were processed and in the light of the time that has elapsed.” In this case, an old news story about a businessman's debts. That standard opened the floodgates to more requests, and sparked outrage from free speech advocates in the U.S. The whole affair reaches back to that same idea of a policy "starting point." Many Europeans think of privacy on a "temporal sliding scale, Shackelford said. "German Chancellor Angela Merkel, 20 years from now, is going to have more privacy rights than she does the day that she leaves office," he said. "That is very different in the U.S. Basically, once you're in the public eye in the U.S., you're always in the public eye, even if it's in an involuntary kind of way."

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With the search for yield, low interest rate environment, and central bank asset purchase programs it’s a question worth asking. Taking one step to answer this question I turned my attention toward the burgeoning ETF market. The chart below, which […] The post Is a Bubble Brewing in Income Assets? appeared first on ValueWalk.

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Samantha Greenberg is a New York City area resident who likes the city’s professional sports teams. The Managing Partner and Chief Investment Officer at Margate Capital, a Goldman Sachs and Paulson & Company alumni, looks at The Madison Square Garden […] The post Samantha Greenberg Likes New York Sports Teams and Technology And Invests That Way appeared first on ValueWalk.

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Alphabet is scheduled to release its next earnings report on Thursday after closing bell, and analysts and investors alike are expecting something excellent. Alphabet stock surged by more than 2% during regular trading hours today as investors pushed it to […] The post Alphabet Inc Stock Soars To Record High Ahead Of Earnings appeared first on ValueWalk.

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A bunch of citizen scientists and aurora photographers in Canada have discovered an atmospheric phenomenon that scientists know little about. The aurora enthusiasts have named it Steve. It has garnered the attention of researchers at the European Space Agency (ESA), NASA, […] The post Steve: A New Atmospheric Phenomenon Puzzling Scientists appeared first on ValueWalk.

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Despite the generally buoyant economic environment, retail store closings in the first quarter of 2017 exceeded those of 2008, showing just how severe the retail downturn has become. According to Credit Suisse’s analysis, there have been 2,880 US store closings […] The post Retail Store Closings Pass 2008 High As Cowen Expects Thousands More To Come appeared first on ValueWalk.

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Kimberly Salzer has stepped down as chief marketing officer of high-speed transportation developer Hyperloop One after a year on the job, according to Recode. She’s reportedly leaving to join Ozobot, a startup making robots designed to teach kids how to […] The post Hyperloop One CMO departs appeared first on ValueWalk.

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During the presidential campaign, Donald Trump advocated for a more disengaged US foreign policy. Involvement in the world would be limited to actions in the interest of the United States. On the surface, this was not an irrational argument. American involvement—chiefly militarily—has […] The post Trump Is Among The Institutionally Weakest National Leaders In The World appeared first on ValueWalk.

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You are not poor; income inequality is a myth; the middle class is doing just fine. That seems to be the message coming from numerous right-leaning think tanks, websites and authors. I was reminded of this yet again over the weekend when I saw another attempt at telling the poor how lucky they are to… Read More The post Its Awesome Being Poor Today! appeared first on The Big Picture.

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Salafism originated in the mid-18th century in an area that now covers Saudi Arabia. It can best be described as an ultraconservative form of Islam. This modern trend within Islam began as a corrective movement in 18th century Arabia to […] The post This Map Shows The Presence Of Salafism In The Middle East And North Africa appeared first on ValueWalk.

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Stock prices are surging in Europe following the first round of election results in France. We'll take a look at why exactly investors are excited about the possible winner. Afterwards, we'll chat with Larry Rosin, the president of Edison Research, about the latest results from our Marketplace-Edison Research Poll. One major source of anxiety for Americans? Having proper health care coverage. And finally, we'll talk about AAA's attempt to lure younger members by wheeling out a new ride-sharing company called "Gig."

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Australia Housing Market – growing woes... UBS’s Australia economics research team headed by Scott Haslem in a note titled “Housing outlook: ring the bell, we’re calling the top” is calling the top of the Australian housing market. In a research […] The post UBS: “This Cannot Go On Forever”, “This Is The Top Of The Australia Housing Market” appeared first on ValueWalk.

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With global stock markets surging on the heels of the French election, today John Embry told King World News that the gold and silver takedown is running into major resistance as the precious metals markets ready for a major move. The post John Embry – Gold And Silver Takedown Failing As Traders Brace A Major Move In The Metals appeared first on King World News.

Read more: http://kingworldnews.com/john-embry-gold-and-silver-takedown-failing-as-traders-brace-a-major-move-in-the-metals/

I have no problem whatsoever with the intent of the DOL fiduciary rule (may it rest in peace). But I was dismayed with the rule’s final form. In fact, I believe that the DOL’s voluminous tome can be distilled to […] The post My Journey Toward A Better, Simpler Fiduciary Rule appeared first on ValueWalk.

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76 US companies declared dividend cuts in March -- 41 more than Feb. The linked article is from January, but has a great chart that puts this all in context.

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Since late 2015, we’ve been tracking Americans' economic anxiety levels through the Marketplace-Edison Research Poll. Just before Election Day last fall, our poll showed that we were experiencing increased levels of economic anxiety. But how is the country feeling now? Larry Rosin, president of Edison Research, joined us to talk about which results were surprising, how people perceive President Trump's tweets, and what Americans value most in a job. Below is an edited transcript. Larry Rosin: This is one of the many surprise findings of this survey: economic anxiety went down, and it went down somewhat dramatically since the last survey before the election. What's interesting is it's pretty much across the board, and it's not clear if it's despite the election, because of the election, or if the election actually is incidental to just general trends that are making people feel more confident. Brancaccio: Did you find that anxiety is down in every age group? Rosin: No. There was one group where anxiety actually rose a bit and that was among 18- to 24-year-olds, the youngest people in our survey. And there's a lot of underlying factors that lead to that anxiety. Things like student loans, or fear about finding a job, keeping a job, fears about health care — all kinds of things. But also you see that this is the group that by far has the least positive impression of President Trump's handling of the economy. So that probably is a factor as well. Brancaccio: Larry, we also asked about some of the approaches advertised by the Trump administration, whether people support publicly pressuring companies off their tweets about business decisions. What do we find here? Rosin: About equal numbers of people said it's a good thing that President Trump pressures businesses and a bad thing that he does. What's fascinating, however, is that Republicans are more likely to like the idea of him pressuring businesses, and Democrats less so. It shows how just clear the partisan story is. If you just asked on sort of a blank slate, "how do you feel about the government pressuring businesses?" — traditionally and historically, Republicans would have been opposed to such an idea. And Democrats probably more in favor. Once you inject the word "Trump" into it, it does really change a lot of the perspective on things. Brancaccio: So in our perpetual search for at least some common ground in America, is there anything that we're more likely to agree on based on the latest findings? Rosin: Huge majorities of Americans on both sides of the aisle were extremely supportive of a large scale infrastructure spending program. There was also overwhelming support for the idea of raising taxes on businesses that move manufacturing jobs overseas. Both Republicans and Democrats supported that in huge numbers. And what I find interesting about that is some of the other things that Trump has focused upon — trade deals, building the wall and immigration — are very much less popular. And so if he looks at our poll, he'll probably pivot to these things that are broadly popular and that might improve his standing with a lot of people. Related links Quiz: Find out your economic anxiety level  You think Washington has 'forgotten' you — and it doesn't matter what party you're in How will we know if Trump's business tweets are translating into jobs? Brancaccio: So talking about anxieties, health care comes to mind for a lot of people, the future of Obamacare and so forth. What do we know from this data? Rosin: We found that the level of anxiety about health care is exceptionally high. A huge majority of people say they worry, at least sometimes, about health care — about it wrecking them financially, about being unable to find insurance or being able to pay for things. So of all the reasons that people have economic anxiety in the states, it turns out health care is probably the single biggest driver. More so than even jobs. And in a previous survey, we asked a question about what makes a good job — including fulfilling work, good pay, being treated fairly. And yet having good health care as part of that job was actually the single biggest definition of a good job for people.  Brancaccio: People who are worried about where this is going as a matter of policy. People, it looks like, are worried about losing the coverage they have. Rosin: Yes, absolutely. Of course for most people, their health care is attached to their job. And so if you lose your job, you're thrown into uncertainty about your health care. And then, of course, the people who have obtained health care through Obamacare and the new exchanges and things of that nature have tremendous concern about: if that were repealed, what would it be replaced with? And would they no longer be able to afford insurance? Brancaccio: Now a major part of economic anxiety is whether or not you hold your job. Most Americans are not worried about losing their job in the next year we find. But 40 percent are and I'm very interested in what people are specifically worried about. Why might they lose their jobs? What did we find out?  Rosin: People in the hourly wage world are much more concerned about work, whether it comes and whether it goes. It's just a world that provides a lot less certainty in the day-to-day work world. And then those concerns are exacerbated by trade and immigration. And if you look at people who are on an hourly wage, they are much more likely to be concerned about the effects of trade deals and the effects of immigration on their ability to make a living. Take our economic anxiety quiz to see how you compare to the national average.

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Beverly Flaxington is a practice management consultant. She answers questions from advisors facing human resource issues. To submit yours, email us here. Advisor Perspectives welcomes guest contributions. The views presented here do not necessarily represent those of Advisor Perspectives. Behavioral […] The post The Importance Of Behavioral Style appeared first on ValueWalk.

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A Morgan Stanley Quantitative Research report points to the declining returns among value-based, quantitative equity funds, perhaps impinging on the rule of supply and demand relative to investment formulas. As new quant tools “democratize investing,” increased competition is reducing returns. […] The post Morgan Stanley: Value-based Quant Investing Losing Effectiveness, But We Have A Solution appeared first on ValueWalk.

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