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New research finds America’s education gap is increasingly a matter of life and death, and lack of job opportunity may be to blame. A new Brookings Institution paper finds alarming midlife mortality increases for less-educated white Americans. It’s a topic with increasing relevance as policy questions swirl about how to create stable jobs that support families as well as presidential election results that reveal a swath of America deeply frustrated with their economic state. RELATED: If the economy is rigged, toward whom?  A new approach to increasing low-income college grads Americans are not so great at talking about death The report from Princeton economists Anne Case and Angus Deaton finds that mortality is sharply rising for those without a college degree and falling for those who are college graduates. There’s also an alarming rise among less-educated, white Americans in suicides and deaths from drug and alcohol abuse. Diminished job prospects for less-educated people seem to take an increasing toll on physical and mental health over time. “The conditions that you face as you enter the labor market as an 18-year-old with a high school degree may become a larger and larger boulder that you have to shoulder over your life,” Case said. Economists have been watching this trend for some time, as policymakers worry about good, stable work disappearing from rural and suburban American communities. The population the researchers focus on is a slice of America getting greater attention after the election. Polls show less-educated whites are big supporters of President Donald Trump. They played a big part in the election result that shocked forecasters.

Read more: Marketplace All Stories

New research finds America’s education gap is increasingly a matter of life and death, and lack of job opportunity may be to blame. A new Brookings Institution paper finds alarming midlife mortality increases for less-educated white Americans. It’s a topic with increasing relevance as policy questions swirl about how to create stable jobs that support families as well as presidential election results that reveal a swath of America deeply frustrated with their economic state. RELATED: If the economy is rigged, toward whom?  A new approach to increasing low-income college grads Americans are not so great at talking about death The report from Princeton economists Anne Case and Angus Deaton finds that mortality is sharply rising for those without a college degree and falling for those who are college graduates. There’s also an alarming rise among less-educated, white Americans in suicides and deaths from drug and alcohol abuse. Diminished job prospects for less-educated people seem to take an increasing toll on physical and mental health over time. “The conditions that you face as you enter the labor market as an 18-year-old with a high school degree may become a larger and larger boulder that you have to shoulder over your life,” Case said. Economists have been watching this trend for some time, as policymakers worry about good, stable work disappearing from rural and suburban American communities. The population the researchers focus on is a slice of America getting greater attention after the election. Polls show less-educated whites are big supporters of President Donald Trump. They played a big part in the election result that shocked forecasters.

Read more: Marketplace All Stories

The post Wage Growth after the Great Recession appeared first on The Big Picture.

Read more: The Big Picture

Authored by Mike Shedlock via MishTalk.com, Recent polls for Italian politicians supporting the eurozone and EU have collapsed. Pro-Europe polls are highly likely to get worse as a  further splintering of Matteo Renzi’s PD party takes place. It is not out of question for Beppe Grillo’s eurosceptic Five Star Movement (M5S) party to achieve an absolute majority in the next election. However, please note that 40% is the threshold for a “majority”. The Financial Times

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Just as Yellen & Co. has finally decided that 'Everything is Awesome' and started raising interest rates (the timing of which we're almost certain was in no way influenced by the conclusion of the recent election cycle), signs continue to mount that global economies are not as healthy as the Fed suddenly believes them to be.  In fact, over just the past couple of days we've highlighted a litany of negative economic data points including crashing bank loan creation, surging auto loan

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In spite of a whole lot of predictions to the contrary, the movie industry is hanging in, even as competition for our attention grows. According to a new report from the Motion Picture Association of America, ticket sales in the U.S. and Canada were flat compared to last year. One bright spot – it turns out the movie industry is attracting a more diverse audience. Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Read more: Marketplace All Stories

The Senate Banking Committee is scheduled to hold a confirmation hearing Thursday on Jay Clayton, President Donald Trump’s choice to head the Securities and Exchange Commission. Clayton does not have a track record in Washington, and that makes it difficult to know if he shares Trump’s distaste for government regulation. But we can tell something from his past experience in the private sector. Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Read more: Marketplace All Stories

Authored by Simon Black via SovereignMan.com, Sometimes you have to marvel at the absurdity of the financial universe in which we live. On one side of the Atlantic, we have the United States of America, which triggered yet another debt ceiling disaster last Thursday when the US government’s maximum allowable debt reset to just over $20 trillion. Of course, the US national debt is pretty much already at $20 trillion. (That’s roughly $166,000 per taxpayer in the Land of the

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A heavyset man sits on a gurney pushed to the side of a hallway in the emergency room at Jefferson Health in Philadelphia. It’s not even 9 a.m, and already beds are filling up. CEO Dr. Stephen Klasko guides me to a fancy-looking IV pump. It can replace nearly half of someone’s blood after they got shot, stabbed or hurt in a car accident. “In the old days, we would lose patients because we weren’t able to get that volume in quickly enough,” he said. “The difference between three minutes or seven minutes could be life and death.” RELATED: House Republicans look for more support with revised health care bill Who wins and loses under the GOP's health care proposal? Health care takes on the fight against trafficking Klasko is showing me around to make a simple point: It takes money to buy powerful equipment. And the bill to repeal Obamacare being voted on tonight in Congress threatens his revenue stream. Klasko estimates the legislation would move about 3 percent of his patients from the insured column to uninsured, which could cut annual revenue by $50 million to $100 million. “There are consequences to these types of policies,” said Rick Pollack, president and CEO of the American Hospital Association. The AHA launched a media campaign against the bill and brought dozens of hospital leaders to lobby members of Congress. The real danger, Pollack said, is that the hospital would have to absorb the cost of care for the uninsured patients. So as executives have made their case to lawmakers, one message they carry is that hospitals are businesses. Pollack said if hospitals lose paying patients, they will have to consider drastic steps. “There could be hospital closures. There could be certain services shut down. There could be staff reductions,” he said. The typical U.S. hospital already has operating margins in the red, said UCLA Law professor Jill Horwitz. We’ve heard about how hospitals may pass any debt from caring for uninsured patients by negotiating higher prices with insurers. But Horwitz said if this legislation passes, hospitals may also look to conduct unnecessary tests and procedures on insured patients as a way to increase revenue. “It’s important not to say they are rapacious doctors and horrible hospitals, and they are trying to squeeze every last dollar out of you,” she said. “But it would be silly to think that hospitals and doctors don’t respond to those incentives. They have to.” That’s the kind of move lots of Americans could see as more people enroll in high-deductible insurance plans. Bottom line, Horwitz said, if hospitals take it on the chin, everybody is going to feel it, insured and uninsured alike.

Read more: Marketplace All Stories

By Nick Kounis of ABN Amro Euro Rates Watch – Will the TLTRO spark carry trades? The last of the ECB’s TLTRO-II operations is expected to have a big take up, with the market expecting EUR 125bn, and some forecasts as high as EUR 300bn From a rates perspective, what matters is whether these funds will trigger flows into the bond or swap markets as banks set up carry trades Carry trades have certainly looked attractive and currently there is a possible spread of around 80bp between the rate

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Authored by Altay Atli via The Strategic Culture Foundation blog, As the diplomatic squabble between Turkey and the Netherlands continues to fester, concerns are raised about whether — and to what extent — the tensions will harm bilateral relations, particularly in economics where the two countries have robust trade and investment connections. For Turkey, the Netherlands offers a large and expanding export market. Trade between the two countries has roots in the 17th century when

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There’s really no polite way to say this. When it comes to the H-1B system, the tech industry is pissed off.  “You know the fantasy of the H-1B opposition is that we’ll just hire more out-of-work coal miners and bring them to New York. And it’s not possible,” said Amol Sarva, a New York-based entrepreneur who’s helped found multiple startups, including Peek and Virgin Mobile USA. “They don’t have the skills or network or knowledge or background,” he said. There are a lot of disagreements surrounding H-1Bs. Critics say jobs that should go to Americans are given away to cheap foreign labor. But Sarva said creating jobs is hard to do when you can’t hire the workers you need. Even worse, the rules surrounding H-1Bs are complicated. It’s so bad that when I call the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Office to clarify the rules, the spokesperson there gets something wrong. She says when workers lose their visas, they have 10 days to leave the country, when really it’s 60.  RELATED: What it's like to live and work in H-1B visa limbo Indians worry about U.S. degree prospects under Trump Some economic context for the immigration debate And with President Donald Trump’s recent executive orders on immigration, what once seemed merely complex and onerous became labyrinthine and even threatening. “We had to set up a separate hotline that was receiving phone calls about 18 hours of the day,” said Ian Macdonald, an immigration attorney with Greenberg Traurig, a law firm with offices around the globe. “Companies are wringing their hands. They’re frustrated. The companies we work with are just looking for simple guidance from the government. They want to be able to plan.”  Virtually all of his clients, when faced with the hassles of applying for and maintaining H-1B status, would prefer to hire American, Macdonald said. But the perceived level of difficulty associated with the H-1B program can vary depending on the size of the firm. Just take the Protect and Grow American Jobs Act. One of three new bills proposed to overhaul the H-1B system, it would see the minimum wage paid to H-1B workers raised from $60,000 to $100,000 a year. “The very large, well-known IT companies, quite frankly, wouldn’t bat an eyelid at paying higher filing fees, paying increased salaries, if it means they can get the employees they deem necessary for their operations,” Macdonald said. Instead, it’s the small to midsize companies that are worried. “The H-1B visa program is a one-size-fits-all. And that’s problematic,” said Daniel Aobdia an accounting professor who studies H-1Bs at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management.  The system is lottery based and companies have to pay the filing fee, up to $4,000 per applicant, to enter. But last year the program was oversubscribed. Triple the number of applicants applied. Chances of getting your application picked were only about one in three. The office of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services says when an application isn’t selected, filing fees are refunded, but that doesn’t include legal fees, lost time or the loss of an employee you need. “Right now the current system privileges certain kinds of companies over other ones,” Aobdia said. Large ones. And small companies that really need one or two special workers can be left facing the difficult decision of whether or not to participate in an expensive gamble. “We didn’t win the lottery. I mean literally. We did not win the lottery,” said Ben Waber, CEO, co-founder of Humanyze, a small tech startup in Boston that analyzes productivity.   Waber is frustrated. His company uses sensors and digital data to better understand how employees collaborate and interact in the workplace. He said the workers he needs are hard to come by. “Literally in our field, there are about three, four dozen people outside my company who can do what we do. Globally,” he said. “Innovation doesn’t happen along these boundaries that are so incredibly scripted by the government,” said Sarva, the New York entrepreneur.  The threat to the U.S. economy doesn’t come from hiring skilled foreign workers, Sarva said. "Far more real is, if you can’t get visas, you just open an office overseas,” he said. That's a decision Waber may be forced to make. “At a fundamental level, businesses need two things to operate in a stable fashion: a stable labor pool and stable regulations,” he said. “And the current administration has thrown both of those really into disarray.” If his employees don’t get their visas next time, Waber is prepared. He’s started pricing office space in Japan and Canada. 

Read more: Marketplace All Stories

People tend to have a hard time discussing the two mathematical concepts of zero and infinity. It's not hard to understand why this is, of course, with reality being a material thing and both the lack of and the infinite amount of something being somewhat foreign. And this manifests itself in all sorts of disciplines, from cosmology to spirituality to physics. And, of course, economics, particularly in the digital age where many of the axioms surrounding physicality no longer apply to

Read more: Techdirt.

We first need to remember where this all started -- nearly a hundred years ago Trotsky was exiled from Russia; he packed his bags and headed for Mexico to start what is known today as the neocon movement. Their stated goal was to spread a brand of government via military means -- remaining in a state of revolution at all times. They are, essentially, communists masquerading as capitalists and they co-opted the republican party. Today, the children of the original neocons, like Bill Kristol,

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After World War II, we split the planet into East and West—with an Iron Curtain in between. Lesser barriers subdivided each side. Time passed. Borders loosened. People and goods started flowing more freely. This was okay at first, but eventually, […] The post Onset of a Global Trade War for People appeared first on ValueWalk.

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David Rosenberg is one of the most respected voices in the investing world. His Breakfast with Dave goes out to thousands of appreciative subscribers nearly every business morning. Rosie is the “Data Meister.” To everyone’s surprise, Rosie turned bullish in […] The post David Rosenberg: The Market Is a Present-Day Version of Pavlov’s Dog appeared first on ValueWalk.

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Authored by Mike Krieger via Liberty Blitzkrieg blog, The Daily Beast just published an article previewing what should be referred to from this day forth as Davos for Democrats; a big-money infused orgy of wealthy donors telling their political puppets what to do as they mingle at one of the most luxurious hotel chains in the world. Clearly learning absolutely zero lessons from their recent election pummeling, the Democratic Party is simply doubling down on its hopelessly failed

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As we wrote about in “China’s Strategy,” East Asia is split into four parts: The Pacific archipelago, the Chinese mainland, the Korean Peninsula, and Indochina. East Asia holds the second and third largest world economies: China and Japan. The relationship […] The post Five Maps That Show China’s Biggest Limitations appeared first on ValueWalk.

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During the so-called Chinese Banking Liquidity Crisis of 2013, the relative cost of funds for non-bank institutions spiked to 100bps. So, the fact that the 'shadow banking' liquidity premium has exploded to almost 250 points - by far a record - in the last few days should indicate just how stressed Chinese money markets are. While interbank borrowing rates have climbed across the board, the surge has been unusually steep for non-bank institutions, including securities companies and

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