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Authored by Denis MacEoin via The Gatestone Institute, "There are plenty of private Muslim schools and madrasas in this city. They pretend that they all preach tolerance, love and peace, but that isn't true. Behind their walls, they force-feed us with repetitive verses of the Qur'an, about hate and intolerance." — Ali, an 18-year-old of French origin, whose father was radicalized. "In England, they are free to speak. They speak only of prohibitions, they impose on

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Paying for health care is an issue that worries many people. In the latest Marketplace-Edison Research Poll, 75 percent of respondents said they were fearful they weren’t going to be able to afford the services they or their family needs. Yet some state and federal lawmakers want people on Medicaid — the health program primarily for children, people with disabilities and low-income Americans — to be more concerned about health care costs. There's a movement, particularly in red states, to increase premiums and cost-sharing for those who are in the program. Oren Cass, with the right-leaning Manhattan Institute, said one problem for many states is that Medicaid spending climbs year after year. One way to slow that, he argues, is making sure people in Medicaid have "skin in the game." Related Quiz: Find out your economic anxiety level Run government as a business? Americans are split You think Washington has 'forgotten' you — and it doesn't matter what party you're in "When you go to the doctor, when you go to the hospital, that’s costing lots of people a lot of money. And that should be a factor in your decision-making," he said. The theory is, simply, the more your own cash is at risk, the more careful you’ll be with that cash. Historically, Medicaid copays have been low — a buck or two. Starting under the Obama administration, a few states, like Iowa, Michigan and Indiana, imposed higher copays and monthly premiums on the Medicaid recipients further up the income scale. But now, with President Trump in office, the state of Wisconsin is pushing a radical proposal. It would "increase the monthly premiums that people pay as much as $10 more a month," said Kevin Kane from Citizen Action of Wisconsin. "And if you fail to do that, you can find yourself kicked off the program. But even if you pay all your premiums, there’s a time limit on how long you can be on it. Forty-eight months over your lifetime." Now, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker is waiting on federal health officials to sign off on his proposal. The question those officials must determine is how the plan would impact people in Wisconsin. "It’s just another punch in the gut," said Michele Mick, a 45-year-old who lives outside Milwaukee. After two bouts with breast cancer, Mick suffers from migraines and fatigue that cost her two full-time jobs. Now she’s working part-time as a saleswoman earning about $1,000 a month. Mick doubts forcing her to pony up more of her own money will improve her physical or financial health. "For me, it would just be, you know, adding to the credit card in hopes of getting to the point where I’m able to pay things off," she said. "It’s stressful when you’re dealing with health issues. And then you throw in financial concerns. I mean, financial issues are stressful." Mick gets that conservatives want to make sure people don’t carelessly use Medicaid services. She said she’s not going on any kind of health care shopping spree. She's just trying to get herself well enough to get back to work and get off Medicaid. Take our economic anxiety quiz to see how you compare to the national average.

Read more: Marketplace All Stories

You may have slept through the lesson your U.S. history class gave on the Panic of 1837, but it's a prophetic subject given the stark similarities it shares with the Great Recession.  Back then, a booming American cotton industry drove banks to lend money to land prospectors, which in turn, created a land bubble. Then that bubble went bust. Following the economic disaster, Americans blamed inner failings — not policy or institutions.   Philip Gura, who teaches English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina, addresses this theme in his book “Man’s Better Angels.” He joined us to discuss his book with host David Brancaccio. Below is an edited transcript of their conversation. David Brancaccio: Professor, back then cotton markets were booming — easy credit flowed to produce what, a bubble in land prices?  Philip Gura: That's right. People were investing in more land to plant more cotton, and before you know it, a depression was spreading through Europe and England and people began calling in the debts and the cotton prices began to plummet. And that just began to kind of run on the banks and a ripple effect that brought the country into really what historians consider the first Great Depression. Related The man who predicted the Great Recession says we're not ready to handle the next downturn Is generosity enough to prop up this post-recession town? How can we tell if a recession is upon us? David Brancaccio: With the terrible dislocation that follows these financial messes, you get a reappraisal. People try to figure out how to fix the system. What were some of the thoughts that followed the 1837 episode? Gura: There was a great debate over whether the system should be fixed by the reformation of individuals, or whether that you actually had to have a larger stage or a political action to solve some of these economic problems. And everyone danced around the fact that really it was the economy. It was the business of cotton that was, of course, running on a slave economy that was the real issue. But instead, they looked inward. They thought that, in fact, in a country that stressed individualism, self-reliance, you had to sort of fix the person first, and the system after that would somehow get back on track. Someone might stop drinking, someone might finally realize through his phrenological reading that he was a little too greedy, so he would try to reform that. But what did that have to do with the major problems in the country? So it was this business of the individual conscience as opposed to any kind of larger state action that really caused the kind of paralysis that occurred during these years. Nothing happened, nothing changed. Brancaccio: In the 19th century context, who went beyond this notion of, "Well, if just individuals fix themselves." Who saw it more systematically? Gura: Well, I think what was being sorted out really was the role of political parties, and it wasn't really until the 1850s with the rise of the Republican Party who realized that slavery had to end soon, that you had concerted action being taken. And finally of course that led to war. But the notion that you could you could somehow get rid of slavery if you just reached individual consciences essentially became bankrupt during this period I'm talking about. It was a wonderfully quixotic notion that really just fix your moral compass and finally people will begin freeing the slaves and would have a different kind of system. That really wasn't the case. So unfortunately, because of the failure of these different kinds of individualistic reforms, you literally lead the country into some kind of cataclysm and civil war.  Brancaccio: It wasn't just policy that came to bear. It took a war and then policy. Gura: That's right. And again, if something had been done incrementally from the 1830s on, if people really would recognize that you couldn't keep the economy running on this kind of system — particularly in a country that purported to be a democracy — things might have been fixed earlier. But instead you look for the easy fix. You look internally, you say, "Well, if I stop drinking alcohol, I'll get myself on track." That's finally a way of making yourself feel good, but not really solving the problem. And I think a lot of our fixes in culture today are the same thing. If you do enough yoga, if you do meditation, if you look at crystals, somehow you'll be healing yourself when in fact the larger issues in the country at large remain right in your face. Brancaccio: If you buckle down and stop drinking sugary drinks, we'll deal with the diabetes epidemic. Gura: Exactly. And then of course, you have those who would say the government has no right telling me that I can't drink or I can't smoke or I can't hold a gun. We haven't sorted out whether we want to be a country based primarily for the individual or for the society as a whole, and that really does stem back, at least, to the 19th century and probably even earlier than that. I mean, Jefferson essentially says we're all created equal. We're on the starting line, let's start running, let's run towards some kind of goal. Well, in that kind of system you're gonna to have people, in fact, who fall behind, who aren't going to be able to make it. So what responsibility do the others, and by extension the government, have in that kind of case? We've never rested easy with the notion finally that there should be help coming from the national level. Brancaccio: In the title "Man's Better Angels," who are some of the angels? Gura: Well, the angel is that within you which you have to access. And these people essentially thought that we were somehow given by our creation, by God, an eternal sense something that really would guide us properly if other things didn't cover it up or if other things didn't bury it. So the angel — is something within that gets buried by the economy, that is buried by greed, gets buried by the kinds of things that pull us away from our better selves.

Read more: Marketplace All Stories

``I've previously written that a board refresh would be a good move, and the result could indeed have been different if the bank's largest shareholder, Berkshire Hathaway Inc. hadn't used its roughly 10 percent stake to back all of the nominated directors.If the Warren Buffett-led conglomerate had instead pushed for a level of accountability, at least four existing board members would have been shown the door and each forced to farewell more than $300,000 in director fees, including Chairman Stephen Sanger. One or all of them should even consider the selfless move of stepping down of
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Pennsylvania’s pension liabilities are dire By SaveScranton Many are aware that Pennsylvania is facing a substantial budget crunch due to excessive debts. But just how bad is Pennsylvania’s debt? Well, the financial hole Pennsylvania is in is so deep that […] The post New Report Shows Pennsylvania’s Pensions Are Doomed appeared first on ValueWalk.

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In the 2016 G20 Summit, advanced economies accused China for steel overcapacity. Before the Hamburg Summit, similar charges have surfaced. Yet, the postwar era has witnessed two steel overcapacity crises. The current debate cannot afford to ignore the past lessons. […] The post G20: SURPASSING THE 2nd GLOBAL STEEL CRISIS appeared first on ValueWalk.

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Published on Apr 21, 2017 We now turn to one area at the cutting edge of scientific development: artificial intelligence, or AI. The field is advancing rapidly in the realm of games, and we’re now seeing robots winning over top […] The post Discussion: Rise of artificial intelligence appeared first on ValueWalk.

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Until the system implodes--you're a genius. So you've ridden the markets higher--stocks, housing, commercial real estate, bat guano, quatloos, you name it--everything you touch turns to gold. What can we say, bucko, other than you're a genius!It's a market truism that rising tides lift all boats. But that's not the really important effect; what really matters is rising tides turn everyone into a genius--at least in their own minds.Those of us who have been seduced by the Sirens' songs of hubris know from bitter experience how easy it is to confuse a rising tide with speculative genius. When everything you touch keeps going higher, the only possible cause is.... your hot hand, of course!Stocks--I'm a genius! Housing--I'm a genius! Commercial real estate--yes, well, I
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One investing school of thought is that you should find an amazing investor and ride his or her coat tails to fun and profit. This certainly worked out well for those who bet on history’s greatest investor, Warren Buffett, by […] The post Icahn At 12% Yield and a Four-Year Low, But Is It Safe? appeared first on ValueWalk.

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No matter the age of your home, you can convert your outdated electrical system into a modern environmentally friendly control center. Simply connect your home with the Enerwave Z-Wave Plus Smart Meter Wireless Lighting Control Dimmer Module to dim lights […] The post Complete Lighting Control At The Tips Of Your Fingers appeared first on ValueWalk.

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On the heels of the stock market euphoria after the French election, this remarkable indicator just plunged to its lowest level in 30 years! The post This Remarkable Indicator Just Plunged To Its Lowest Level In 30 Years! appeared first on King World News.

Read more: http://kingworldnews.com/this-remarkable-indicator-just-plunged-to-its-lowest-level-in-30-years/

Authored by Gaius Publius via Down With Tyranny blog, "We don't want a unified Korean peninsula ... We [also] don't want the North Koreans to cause more trouble than the system can absorb." —Hillary Clinton, 2013, speech to Goldman Sachs Our policy toward North Korea is not what most people think it is. We don't want the North Koreans to go away. In fact, we like them doing what they're doing; we just want less of it than they've been doing lately. If this

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By Become a Better Investor   China Equity FVMR Snapshot Fundamentals: China expensive relative to global market Remember that FVMR stands for fundamentals, valuation, momentum and risk. Those are the factors that I like to look at. The first thing we […] The post Relative to Global Market, China Still Expensive appeared first on ValueWalk.

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Exactly one day ago, we reported that "China's first domestically built aircraft carrier will soon launch in Dalian, Liaoning Province for drills and trial voyages, putting to the test proprietary technology meant to further Beijing's expansion in the South and East China seas." A dock at the Dalian shipyard was being filled with water Sunday the local press reported, in preparation for the launch. The Chinese-made vessel is expected to enter service around 2020, joining China's first and only

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The USS Mahan has to take evasive actions in the Straits of Hormuz today, in order to avoid an Iranian 'fast attack' vessel. The Mahan sounded the danger alarm, fired flares and manned their weapons, but the Iranian cowards tucked tail and scattered before reaching within 1,000 yards of the U.S. destroyer. "Coming inbound at a high rate of speed like that and manning weapons, despite clear warnings from the ship, is obviously provocative behavior," said one American official in

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Iran news agency FARS reports that according to Syrian military sources, Moscow has informed Damascus of its preparedness to dispatch ground troops to Syria. FARS - which like most US media should always be taken with a gran of salt - quotes the Al-Hadath news, according to whose sources Russia has announced that in case of the Syrian army's request it is ready to send ground forces to Syria. The sources said that special Russian forces are prepared to be deployed in regions which are

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After a disappointing March for the auto OEM's, a hopeful wall street has set it's sites on a rebound in April with consensus SAAR estimates currently set at 17.25 million, up from 16.53 million in March.  Per the chart below, the March 2017 print for auto sales was the lowest in over two years, despite massive incentive spending by the OEMs.   Of course, OEMs didn't bother to adjust production levels to sinking sales which pushed inventory days to the highest March print since

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Remember when the catalyst for the relentless, seemingly inexplicable broad market melt-up in mid-February was revealed to be an overeager short-biased hedge fund, which had been caught in a "short gamma" feedback loop, forced to buy more S&P futures the higher the market went? Well, as RBC's Charlie McElliggott writes, the "short gamma" feedback loop appears to have returned as yet another fund is now caught in the same trap, and the market will soon test just what the fund's point of

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If you want to take the temperature on where the craft beer brewing industry is on the convergence of an exploding industry and the greater use of trademark law, you need only look at what intellectual property lawyers are saying. We had just discussed a Q&A with several IP attorneys in wine country lamenting on how trademark law is throwing up roadblocks to a likewise expanding wine industry and the need for a more nuanced interpretation of marketplaces within the alcohol industries.

Read more: Techdirt.

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