http://i.imgur.com/j9TJzzN.gif

Holidays in Asia, Sri Lanka

Sri Lanka, wonder of Asia

Guesthouse, Villa, Bungalows

nicest beaches, crystal clear waters

Tangalle / Southcoast

Villa Araliya

now special offers

Global News Search

Please make the Cache directory writable.
Please make the Cache directory writable.
Please make the Cache directory writable.

Who's online

We have 164 guests online

Search

A+ R A-
Do you think the government in Washington generally represents your interests, or has the government forgotten about “people like you?” That was the new question we asked in our latest Marketplace-Edison Research Poll.  Despite greater confidence about their economic futures, a whopping three-quarters of our respondents feel overlooked by Washington.  “We're the forgotten Americans. We're swept under the rug,” said Glen Perkins, 60, an African-American truck driver in La Vergne, Tennessee, who participated in our poll. To feel less “forgotten,” Perkins said he would want to see the federal government address African-Americans' high unemployment rates and invest more in public schools. He said the charter schools and vouchers championed by Education Secretary Betsy DeVos won’t serve the needs of black families. “To make a change, they're going to have to specifically say there is a problem going on in black America."  Perkins, a Democrat, didn't vote for President Trump. But even respondents who did help elect the president expressed the feeling that Washington doesn’t look after their interests.  Related Quiz: Find out your economic anxiety level Economic anxiety has eased in the U.S., unless you're a millennial You think Washington has 'forgotten' you — and it doesn't matter what party you're in “Well, not very well,” is how Fred Cousins, 80, of Fort Smith, Arkansas, described how his interests are represented. Cousins, a former furniture manufacturer, said he likes Trump’s focus on thwarting the offshoring of jobs. And he admires Trump’s appointees, especially Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch. But Cousins nevertheless expressed cynicism about Washington politicians.  “They speak one way and dance another,” he said. “And will they perform? Who knows.” “Feeling forgotten” is just another way to express Americans’ deep-seated distrust toward the federal government, according to Steven Smith, a political scientist at Washington University in St. Louis.  “There is a great deal of frustration with Washington, and virtually every poll — no matter what question is asked — shows that,” he said. Smith said surveys show public trust in the federal government has been falling for decades, with a few periods of temporary improvement. He said the distrust is linked to the sense that politicians — liberals and conservatives alike — are unable to compromise on issues like health care. “Instead what we see is the scoring of political points against each other,” he said. “That breeds frustration on the part of everyone. It leads to very low ratings for the president and even lower ratings for Congress. Both sides dislike Congress." But there are ways for citizens to deal with their frustrations and feelings of being forgotten, according to UC Berkeley emerita sociologist Arlie Hochschild. She’s written about Tea Party loyalists’ sense of disenfranchisement in rural Louisiana in her book "Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right." She had this advice for voters: “I think it's very important for citizens to get active and go to town meetings,” she said. “In other words, try to get seen.” The more that happens, she said, the less forgotten people will be. Take our economic anxiety quiz to see how you compare to the national average.

Read more: Marketplace All Stories

“Davidson” submits: The Chemical Activity Barometer(CAB) was reported at an all time high once again. The SP500 on the French primary outcome has surged higher as have Intl LgCap issues and the US$ is lower. The sands of economics are […] The post Chemical Activity & Tbill Spread Indicate Higher Markets Ahead appeared first on ValueWalk.

Read more: ValueWalk

Looks like the pound is clearly being front-run by leakers...

Read more: Implode-Explode Heavy Industries news feed

This is just one of the stories from our "I've Always Wondered" series, where we tackle all of your questions about the world of business, no matter how big or small. Ever wondered if recycling is worth it? Or how store brands stack up against name brands? Check out more from the series here. Listener Steven Yancey sent in this question: Why does cream cheese come in packaging that is so difficult to reuse? Venture to the nearest supermarket and there is a chance that the cream cheese stocked on its shelves comes wrapped in tin foil and a thin cardboard box. Turns out Philadelphia Cream Cheese — the global brand of cream cheese made by Kraft — has been wrapped in tin foil for more than dozen decades. “We still use foil for our brick Philadelphia Cream Cheese,” said Lynne Galia, a Kraft spokeswoman told Marketplace. “Foil provides a strong light and oxygen barrier for our product, limiting oxidation, which helps maintain the great taste and quality of our Philadelphia Cream Cheese. High quality Philadelphia Cream Cheese has been made, wrapped in foil, since the late 1800s. While we don’t have details on the origin of the brick shape, it certainly makes sense to package this dairy product in foil.” Kraft does sell cream cheese in plastic tubs; some U.S. supermarkets carry both packagings. Typically, flavored cream cheese comes in a plastic tub while the plain classic cream cheese is most often found wrapped in a foil. The plastic containers are easier to reuse after opening than the tin foil packaging. In the United Kingdom, Philadelphia Cream Cheese is only sold in plastic containers. The company’s global arm, which is now a separate company known as Mondelez, only sold cream cheese in tin foil between the 1960s and 1980s. On the history page of its U.K. website, the cream cheese manufacturer notes that between the years 1977 and 1985, new packaging was introduced along with new flavored and low fat cream cheeses. “The fiddly foil packages are replaced with a handy tub,” according to the site. To find out why cream cheese was packaged in foil in the first place, Marketplace reached out to Jeff Marx, a rabbi and a cream cheese expert. "Cream cheese is a very soft cheese. It has to be wrapped for it to maintain some type of form," explained Marx. Back in 1877, William Lawrence was manufacturing cream cheese at his farm in Chester, New York. To wrap his cheese, he used 3-by-4 inch square-like forms and manila tissue paper that Marx described as a firm piece of paper. Related links Kraft tries out cream cheese on JetBlue Company seeks American cheese 'revolution' "Up to this time, almost all cheese was produced in round hoops, but when you are packing smaller cheeses in a box to ship them, you can pack more cheeses in square form than in a round form. This is one of the key moments in manufacturing where product's shape changes for various production reasons." In 1880, Lawrence was approached by Alvah Reynolds, who wanted to distribute the cream cheese produced by Lawrence. "Reynolds is a marketing genius. He says to Lawrence: ‘You need a name for your cheese.’ Because up till now, you just got a cheese in a box that says ‘sold by Lawrence.’ So Reynolds says, ‘Let's give it a name.’ And he says: ‘Look, Philadelphia has a reputation for fine cheeses. It has for a long period of time. Let's call it a Philadelphia cheese, and let's put the name on the cheese wrappers," Marx said. Reynolds also suggested that they use tin foil, which would be easier to imprint. The two men do exactly that. "And from then on, Philadelphia's cream cheese has this signature form wrapped in tin foil with Philadelphia cream cheese printed on the top."

Read more: Marketplace All Stories

``Justin Trudeau has always played nice with Donald Trump. The refugee-hugging liberal bit his tongue, flooded Washington with envoys, feted Ivanka Trump on Broadway and relentlessly talked up Canada-U.S. ties. It hasn't worked.''

Read more: Implode-Explode Heavy Industries news feed

“And it is He who created the heavens and the earth in six days.” Thus read the draft version of a proposed textbook for 10th-grade geography students in Azerbaijan in a section about how the universe was formed. As homework, […] The post Azerbaijan: Creationist Textbooks Stir Controversy, Public Action appeared first on ValueWalk.

Read more: ValueWalk

Twitter Results

Are being misjudged. Tomorrow the short-messaging social network will reveal its numbers and the analysts will gasp, the pundits will swoon, and everybody will say that Twitter needs to be fixed. But that’s not the truth at all. By Wall Street standards Twitter’s a diving joke. A company that’s hit a financial wall with no… Read More The post Twitter Results appeared first on The Big Picture.

Read more: The Big Picture

Consumer stocks  new active shorting As markets continue their steady grind higher, and volatility remains suppressed, shorts are giving up their crusade against equities. According to TwoRivers Analytics’ monthly short report for April, the market value of short interest was […] The post Investors Reduce Financial Shorts But Increase Bets Against Consumer Stocks appeared first on ValueWalk.

Read more: ValueWalk

``"The increasing divergence between global equity market performance and bond markets has raised questions as to whom is right," Jefferies Group LLC analysts led by Sean Darby wrote in a note. Figuring out which market will be on the right side of history is a pressing issue for analysts, investors and traders. If government bonds prove correct, risk appetite may soon vanish; if the optimism displayed by stocks and corporate bonds is vindicated, then interest-rate markets are likely to sell off in coming months, according to strategists.''

Read more: Implode-Explode Heavy Industries news feed

Globalization and the growing trend of traveling have increased the number of people traveling to foreign countries each year. This growing trend has brought with it increased GDP growth due to tourism spending. While some countries receive more visitors than […] The post Mapped: The World’s Dependency On Their Tourism Industries appeared first on ValueWalk.

Read more: ValueWalk

Five years ago, Marketplace explored how machines, robots and software algorithms were increasingly entering the workforce in our series "Robots Ate My Job." Now, we're looking at what humans can do about it with a new journey to find robot-proof jobs. The research and development budget for the Department of Defense was $71 billion in 2016. Compare that to the Department of Labor, which was roughly $4 million. That's a statistic Thomas Kalil, former deputy director for technology and innovation at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, wants Americans to reflect on.  "There's not a group at the Department of Labor who's saying, 'How could we take advances in artificial intelligence and figure out how [they] would be used to reduce the time for a non-college educated worker to gain a skill that is a ticket to the middle class?'" said Khalil, now an entrepreneur-in-residence at University of California, Berkeley, after leaving his post at the end of the Obama administration. While others advocate for a universal basic income to offset lost wages due to automation or a tax on robots taking people's jobs, Kalil believes the government should work with the brightest minds and companies to invest massively in new ways to help workers adapt to a workforce that increasingly includes algorithms, software and machines doing the work humans used to.  Related Quiz: Which jobs will and won't survive a robot takeover? What universal basic income could mean for the future of work Former Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers says taxing robots makes no sense Kalil pointed to a pilot Navy training program run several years ago by Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the same agency that invented the internet. "The problem that they were trying to solve is could they reduce the time required for new Navy recruits to become an expert in a technical subject," said Kalil, "and reduce that time from years to months." The Navy needed a lot of people to learn information technology systems administration in order to deal with computers blacking out at sea. DARPA, along with a Silicon Valley firm called Acuitus, studied the optimal relationship between a teacher and student and developed a one-on-one artificial intelligence system to supplement human instructors.  "You know, if everyone had their own Socrates," Kalil said, "the [system] can figure out how to keep you on the knife-edge between you being bored because the problem is too easy and you being frustrated because the material is too hard." Not only that, but the computer also figured out a way to help students when they got stuck, with just the minimum hint necessary for them to figure it out themselves. Early evaluations of the program, called Education Dominance, were very promising.   "After four or five months, these new Navy recruits were outperforming people who had been with the Navy for seven to 10 years," Kalil said. That's just one program, but Kalil's broader point is there might be a way to apply advances in technology to smooth the disruption it brings to the job market. "The private sector is underinvesting because they might not see an immediate opportunity," Kalil said, "and the agencies that are responsible for worrying about these issues, like the Department of Labor, like HUD, we've never said, 'Hey, you should have a research arm that could do for economic and social mobility what DARPA's does for the military or what NIH does for biomedical research.'" A moonshot research project is one idea for adjusting to the teched-up labor market of the future. Another idea comes from Harvard economist Richard Freeman. He proposes getting more people to own the robots. In other words, what if workers had an ownership stake in the machines taking their jobs?  "One of the things that has happened in last 20 to 30 years is the share of income that goes to capital has increased and the share of income that goes to labor has fallen," Freeman said. "We have to do something to change that if we're going to allow normal working people's living standards to go up."  Freeman thinks fighting the machines, in essence fighting technological progress, makes little sense. "The best thing is [the workers] should become capitalists in some sense and own part of it." Freeman suggests creating incentives for workers to buy stock and for companies to pay their workers in stock. The idea is stocks will go up as companies get more profitable from new technology. If workers become shareholders, they can benefit along with company owners from these productivity gains.  "You certainly would want to have shares not only in the company that you are working at, that's always risky, you'd want to have a broad-based set of shares," Freeman said. "About 10 percent of American workers are in employee stock ownership plan companies, and many high-tech firms have either profit sharing and ownership schemes or stock option plans." Freeman said this payment model has been shown to make employees work harder and smarter while also giving them a protection if their wages don't rise due to technological or other reasons. Like any big idea, it will require a big change in our laws and in our culture — a change that we might not yet be ready to make.  Interested in other ways to "Robot-Proof" the American workforce? Listen to our special podcast and check out the most and least automatable jobs in America.

Read more: Marketplace All Stories

How do you take your plaque? C’mon, we all have our victual vices that risk turning the gourmet in us gourmand. Those naughty nibbles that do so tempt us. Is it a bacon, cheese, well…anything? Maybe a slice of pie […] The post Ode To Investors: Super Size Me! appeared first on ValueWalk.

Read more: ValueWalk

Today’s financial repression is set to last for decades (and possibly forever) as policymakers are seeking to keep government funding costs low rather than increasing regular taxes or cutting entitlements that’s according to a new report from Macquarie’s economics research […] The post Financial Repression Is Here To Stay As Governments Run Out Of Options appeared first on ValueWalk.

Read more: ValueWalk

On Tuesday a US-Canada trade dispute intensified as Justin Trudeau and Donald Trump clashed over softwood lumber and dairy tariffs. This dispute is just one of the trade confrontations the Trump administration has already faced in its short term and […] The post US-Canada Trade Dispute Is About Votes Not Money appeared first on ValueWalk.

Read more: ValueWalk

The US venture market was a bit unsettled heading into 2017. Dealmaking last year was a bit frosty compared to 2014 and 2015, when capital seemed easy to come by. To be fair, there were many unknowns: Would the new […] The post What The Current US Venture Industry Looks Like In 24 Charts appeared first on ValueWalk.

Read more: ValueWalk

Last week, the discount shoe retailer Payless ShoeSource filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy and announced it will close 400 brick-and-mortar stores throughout the United States and Puerto Rico. The announcement comes on the heels of a seemingly unending parade of bad news […] The post Retail Stores Are Dying And We Should Let Them appeared first on ValueWalk.

Read more: ValueWalk

The post The Battle of the Best Savings Accounts appeared first on ValueWalk.

Read more: ValueWalk

The post The No-Brainer Way To Maximize Your Nest Egg appeared first on ValueWalk.

Read more: ValueWalk

This morning, we'll discuss the positive numbers coming from businesses and the markets —the Nasdaq closed above 6,000 for the first time while company earnings reports have been decent across the board. Afterwards, we'll look at the potential effects of Trump's proposed corporate tax rate cut on government revenue, and then examine the disparities in per-child spend at schools in different states. 

Read more: Marketplace All Stories

Google co-founder Sergey Brin is reportedly building his own large secret airship inside a NASA hangar, according to Bloomberg. Citing sources familiar with the matter, the media outlet says the craft is being housed at NASA’s Ames Research Center. Is […] The post Google’s Sergey Brin Is Building A Secret Airship [REPORT] appeared first on ValueWalk.

Read more: ValueWalk

On a day where stocks are rallying and gold is flat, top trends forecaster Gerald Celente has just released a fourth major trend forecast for 2017! The post Gerald Celente Just Released Fourth Major Trend Forecast For 2017! appeared first on King World News.

Read more: http://kingworldnews.com/gerald-celente-just-released-frouth-major-trend-forecast-2017/

Page 1 of 6146


Warning: Illegal string offset 'active' in /www/htdocs/w00f1f37/templates/gk_twn2/html/pagination.php on line 129

Warning: Illegal string offset 'active' in /www/htdocs/w00f1f37/templates/gk_twn2/html/pagination.php on line 135

Warning: Illegal string offset 'active' in /www/htdocs/w00f1f37/templates/gk_twn2/html/pagination.php on line 129

Warning: Illegal string offset 'active' in /www/htdocs/w00f1f37/templates/gk_twn2/html/pagination.php on line 135

Warning: Illegal string offset 'active' in /www/htdocs/w00f1f37/templates/gk_twn2/html/pagination.php on line 129

Warning: Illegal string offset 'active' in /www/htdocs/w00f1f37/templates/gk_twn2/html/pagination.php on line 135

Warning: Illegal string offset 'active' in /www/htdocs/w00f1f37/templates/gk_twn2/html/pagination.php on line 129

Warning: Illegal string offset 'active' in /www/htdocs/w00f1f37/templates/gk_twn2/html/pagination.php on line 135

Warning: Illegal string offset 'active' in /www/htdocs/w00f1f37/templates/gk_twn2/html/pagination.php on line 129

Warning: Illegal string offset 'active' in /www/htdocs/w00f1f37/templates/gk_twn2/html/pagination.php on line 135

Warning: Illegal string offset 'active' in /www/htdocs/w00f1f37/templates/gk_twn2/html/pagination.php on line 129

Warning: Illegal string offset 'active' in /www/htdocs/w00f1f37/templates/gk_twn2/html/pagination.php on line 135

Warning: Illegal string offset 'active' in /www/htdocs/w00f1f37/templates/gk_twn2/html/pagination.php on line 129

Warning: Illegal string offset 'active' in /www/htdocs/w00f1f37/templates/gk_twn2/html/pagination.php on line 135

Warning: Illegal string offset 'active' in /www/htdocs/w00f1f37/templates/gk_twn2/html/pagination.php on line 129

Warning: Illegal string offset 'active' in /www/htdocs/w00f1f37/templates/gk_twn2/html/pagination.php on line 135

Warning: Illegal string offset 'active' in /www/htdocs/w00f1f37/templates/gk_twn2/html/pagination.php on line 129

Warning: Illegal string offset 'active' in /www/htdocs/w00f1f37/templates/gk_twn2/html/pagination.php on line 135

Warning: Illegal string offset 'active' in /www/htdocs/w00f1f37/templates/gk_twn2/html/pagination.php on line 129

Warning: Illegal string offset 'active' in /www/htdocs/w00f1f37/templates/gk_twn2/html/pagination.php on line 135