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You're probably used to playing games on your smartphone or tablet with the limited functionality of your fingers on the touchscreen, but with this Wireless Mobile Gaming Controller you can sync and play games with a full-scale, multi-buttoned controller. Play more advanced games at more advanced levels by simply pairing the controller with your device with Bluetooth. You want the high score? Here's where you start. Available in the Deals store for only $52.95. Note: The Techdirt Deals

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Caveat emptor to buyers of China Credit Bonds, says a new report from a big investment bank. With limited breakeven spreads across all tenors and yield curves staying flat, one UBS analyst remains defensive on China’s credit bonds and prefers […] The post UBS Remains Defensive On China’s Credit Bonds appeared first on ValueWalk.

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Back in 2015, Techdirt wrote about a government project in China that involves "citizen scores," a rating system that will serve as a measure of a person's political compliance. The authorities aim to do that by drawing on the huge range of personal data that we all generate in our daily use of the Internet. The data would be scooped up from various public and private services and fed into an algorithm to produce an overall citizen score that could be used to reward the obedient and punish the

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There may be nothing more frustrating than trademarks being granted for terms that serve as simple geographic identifiers. With a couple of recent stories revolving around names of cities, or acronyms of them, it's probably time to consider whether some kind of official reform of trademark rules needs to be undertaken to keep companies from locking up such broad terms for commercial purposes. And there may be at least a slim chance that this conversation is starting, with the high profile

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Oxfam, the leftwing NGO devoted to poverty relief has released a new report blaming poverty in wealth inequality. In other words, its central claim is that the existence of very wealthy people creates poverty. The report is largely just an […] The post Oxfam’s Latest Screed Again Inequality Ignores Global Trends, Demands Higher Taxes appeared first on ValueWalk.

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Total capital raised by new US private equity firms and their first funds came just shy of $7.5 billion in 2016, across 26 vehicles. Although both figures were distinct increases from 2015—which logged 17 first-time PE funds and $4.6 billion […] The post First-Time PE Funds Make Comeback, Still Low Portion Of Total Fundraising appeared first on ValueWalk.

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Trump reaffirmed his skepticism about the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, discussing in European media interviews his readiness to make deals with Russia. (Trump isn’t famous for his policy consistency) European leaders wondering whether they can still rely on the American security umbrella:   Ripping NATO, Trump Makes Europe Nervous and Arms Trade Happy Click for… Read More The post Do NATO Members Pay Their Fair Share? appeared first on The Big Picture.

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You need Insiders who are loyal to an Outsider and an Outsider agenda to accomplish any real reforms.Readers ask a reasonable question: if Trump is a political Outsider, then why has he stuffed his staff with Insiders--Goldman Sachs alumni, generals, etc.? The question follows an understandable logic: wouldn't an Outsider appoint other outsiders? The doubt expressed also follows a reasonable logic: if Insiders are running the Trump administration, won't it be just another case of "meet the new boss, same as the old boss"?I think there is another dynamic in play here which I have laid out in this chart:Outsiders can be effective in meeting their policy goals (i.e. "success"), but they need Insiders who know how to get things done within a self-serving Estbalishment that is
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If you've ever traveled to Japan, you've probably been amazed by the fancy toilet seats. They are hyper-efficient and hyper-futuristic. Toto is the best-known brand. But when tourists were surveyed in 2014, according to The Wall Street Journal, a quarter of foreign users said that they didn't understand the various buttons nor their respective functions on a typical Toto toilet. So, the makers of the high-tech toilets have announced plans to standardize the buttons — using a new set of logos created by the Japan Sanitary Equipment Industry Association — to make things easier on the tourists.  

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In one of its last acts, the Obama administration has contributed $500 million to a United Nations fund that will help developing countries deal with climate change. That brings the total contributed by the U.S. to $1 billion — which sounds like a lot. Is it?

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2016 was a record year for venture fundraising, and VCs in 2017 may well be picking up where they left off. New Enterprise Associates is looking to raise up to $3 billion for its latest flagship fund, according to an […] The post NEA’s New Fund Target? $3 Billion appeared first on ValueWalk.

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International Business Machines (IBM) Information Technology – IT Services | Reports January 19, After Market Closes International Business Machines 4Q Earnings – Key Takeaways The Estimize consensus is calling for earnings per share of $4.93 on $21.71 billion in revenue, […] The post International Business Machines Corp. Prepares For Another Quarter Of Negative Growth appeared first on ValueWalk.

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``...the DBCFT would impose a flat 20 percent tax only on earnings from sales of output consumed within the United States... It gets complicated, but the upshot is that the cost of imported supplies would no longer be deductible from taxable income, while all revenue from exports would be. This would be a huge incentive to import less and export more, significant change indeed for an economy deeply dependent on global supply chains.... [but] Trading partners could also challenge the GOP plan as a discriminatory subsidy at the World Trade Organization. That's because it includes a deduction
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Askeladden Capital Partners letter for the fourth quarter ended December 31, 2016. Also see Q3 2016 Hedge Fund Letters 2016 Hedge Fund Letters Zeke Ashton of Centaur Partners Full Interview With ValueWalk Askeladden Capital letter below Dear Partners, On January […] The post Askeladden Capital Partners Up 56 Percent In Inaugural Year appeared first on ValueWalk.

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Congressman Tom Price, President-elect Donald Trump’s pick to head up the Department of Health and Human Services, faced his first Senate confirmation hearing today. While he was light on the specifics of what the incoming Trump administration wants to replace Obamacare with, he did say, "I think health savings accounts and high-deductible catastrophic coverage are things that make a whole lot of sense  for many individuals, and we ought not force anybody to do anything. It ought to be a voluntary choice, but they ought to have the choice to be able to select them." Those high-deductible or “catastrophic” plans work like this: you pay most of your own medical bills up to a specific amount — usually thousands of dollars — before your insurance kicks in. Price, and congressional Republicans say they’re a big part of what should replace Obamacare. And it’s not just the GOP who likes them; Democrats and employers have also embraced these plans. But here’s a complication: researchers do not know if high-deductible plans actually lead to good health care.  It's a question that preoccupies Dr. Ashish Jha, a physician and health policy professor at Harvard University. In fact, Jha is so concerned with how high-deductible plans influence health care that he's conducting a very personal experiment: Jha switched his own family to one of these plans. Dr. Ashish Jha and his wife Deborah Stump. Ashish Jha "I thought…it would be really useful, as a family, to know what it actually feels like to have to pay for everything out of pocket at least until you hit your deductible," said Jha.  Now, he and his family are on the hook for everything from prescriptions to caring for the odd cast of strep throat, until they've spent $6,000 — that's the cap on their plan. "High-deductible health plans are supposed to make the healthcare system work better. And none of us has the exact right answer for what American health care needs to look like," Jha said. What experts like Jha have known for decades is that people on high-deductible plans spend less on their health care. And that's not necessarily a good thing. It makes a big difference, for example, what a consumer cuts back on. Some expenses can be wasteful, like buying name-brand drugs when a generic alternative is available. Others can be critical, like the expense of a cardiologist appointment. Families also face the question of whose care they're willing to spend less on. Dr. Jha's wife, Deb Stump, says they learned about this first hand when their son needed a follow-up appointment after surgery.  "In the past, I would have just called and made the appointment," Stump said. "But this time, because it was a specialist, I was pretty sure it was going to be quite expensive." When it came to their son, though, spending the money seemed to be worthwhile.  "I sat on it for a while and I called Ashish [Jha]... and Ashish said [our son] should probably just have the follow-up," Stump said. "So we had a probably two minute visit — and it ended up costing $465." For Jha and Stump, and tens of thousands of families like them, this is the new normal. High-deductible plans push people to shop around for health treatments, often without the benefit of information on quality and price.  That worries Amitabh Chandra, an economist and health care researcher at Harvard University.  "Simply calling the patient a consumer doesn’t make buying health care anything like buying cars and computers," said Chandra. In fact, Chandra’s research shows that even higher-income earners with more economic flexibility do not really shop for health care efficiently, even when they're given a state-of-the-art computer program to compare prices. People on these plans tend to forgo all sorts of care, regardless of their own need and health status.  "Prevention, imaging, or drugs — consumers were cutting back on all those. And that’s a sign they don’t really know what care is valuable and what care isn’t valuable," said Chandra. In health care research, a new consensus is forming, in part because of Chandra’s work: high-deductible plans with cheaper premiums work well for people who are generally healthy. But for those who are chronically ill or live on lower incomes, these plans can be a disaster. At any income level, in fact, they incentivize the consumer to cut back on care they may need.  It could have been a disaster for Jha. He has a heart condition that occasionally causes spikes in his heartbeat. "Imagine running as fast as you can and your heart is racing. Just imagine that continues for minutes and minutes," said Jha. "It’s not a great feeling." These episodes usually pass quickly. But the most recent one, which Jha experienced after a bruising international business trip, was a particularly bad bout. At half-an-hour, his heart was still racing. After an hour, his wife urged  Jha to go to the Emergency Room. "And I was resisting it. She actually asked me, 'if a patient of yours called you with this, what would you recommend to them?' And I said, ‘oh, yeah, that’s easy. Go to the [Emergency Department],'" Jha said.  Though he knew he could be experiencing a heart attack, Jha didn’t want to spend $2,000 or more getting checked out in the ER — even though he said he could afford that. In retrospect, Jha said he should have gone to the hospital. "But, you know, I knew there was a big bill waiting for me if I did, and I rolled the dice," he said.  Jha got lucky. After an hour his heart rate began to slow. But his experiment, putting his family on a high-deductible plan, is helping him see the reality of what many health care researchers are finding: these plans can put people in difficult positions. Sometimes, in fact, they can force people to make decisions as if they were their own doctor; and that’s something even a physician struggled to do for himself.

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TheEuropean Central Bankmeets today/tonight depending where you’re reading!  One thing that will be on their mind, whether they admit it or not, will be the sharp turnaround in inflation seen for the Eurozone.  As we looked at earlier today there […] The post Eurozone inflation (surprise) appeared first on ValueWalk.

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With the metals off to a good start in 2017, is the price of silver getting ready to rip higher? The post Is The Price Of Silver Getting Ready To Rip Higher? appeared first on King World News.

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``On Tuesday, the dollar fell 1.25% against the basket of currencies in the Dollar Index. The index is down 3% since its peak at the end of 2016. US companies that report in dollars but have sales and income outside the US in other currencies -- which is much of the S&P 500 -- love this. When they translate their foreign-currency revenues and earnings into weaker dollars, they get to show more dollars.''

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Was anybody here trading in 2003? It was the year we invaded Iraq (regrettably). The markets were expecting a decisive victory. During the days and weeks when American troops advanced on Baghdad, the market climbed. As they entered Baghdad and […] The post Inauguration Day Could Be A Big Turning Point In The Stock Market – Look To 2003 appeared first on ValueWalk.

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On Tuesday, we introduced you to Erie County, Pennsylvania, where constituents in November voted for a Republican presidential candidate for the first time since 1984. It's the start of "The Big Promise," our yearlong reporting project based in Erie. What happens in a place where the economy's changing, manufacturing jobs have left and those voters are counting on the promises the president-elect made during the campaign? Today, we're visiting Union City, Pennsylvania — population 3,300, located in the rural outskirts of Erie County. In small towns like Union City, there's always a place where the locals gather. Here, it's Ma-Donna's restaurant, where the motto is "Enter a stranger, leave a friend." Tonette Diffenbacher, co-owner of Ma-Donna's with her sister, has lived in Erie County her whole life — like many of the people we've met in Erie County. Tonette Diffenbacher Maitham Basha-Agha/Marketplace When asked how she's feeling about things, she replied, "I'm hoping that they're going to think about the little people, taxwise, economy. Get some jobs in here. Stuff like that. I'm not real sure how that's going to happen. I'm not real sure. There's just so many things in this town that are now gone. There used to be several big businesses in town." Union City once called itself "the chair capital of the world." Manufacturers like Ethan Allen made furniture here, and boats and tools, but most of those companies have left, taking hundreds of jobs in the city with them. Every morning at 8 a.m., a group sits down at what Diffenbacher affectionately called the "Troyer table."  Members of the Troyer table at Ma-donna's Restaurant.  Maitham Basha-Agha/Marketplace The group consists of dairy farmer Merv Troyer; his brother and local realtor, Norm Troyer; William Mitchell, who works in the oil and gas industry; taxidermist Blaine Blakeslee; and fourth-generation funeral director Bob Glenn. They sit around the table and have the same conversations that are happening across the country. "The election was a revolt. Absolute revolt," Norm Troyer said.  But Bob Glenn has doubts about Trump. "He can show his golden palace where he lives and talk about how rich he is and all this and that, but he's never made an effort to pay back the companies that he left bankrupt," Glenn said. "That's where I have my reservations, specifically because he's come out and said, 'We're going to keep jobs in this country.'" Norm points to the economic disconnect that made Trump popular in places like Union City. "The coastal areas, they have their cozy little deals going on, but you don't make $30 an hour in our town," he said. "More like $10, $15, if you're lucky to have a job.... He represents more of us, the common, ordinary person. We have to hitch our wagon to that hope that this revolution can bring something to us ... all of us." Down on the other end of Main Street, there was a sign welcoming visitors to town, a sign that Union City native Brian Maynard said sums up what happened to Union City: Left: Union City's former “Welcome Chair.” Right: An abandoned chair factory in Union City.  Maitham Basha-Agha/Marketplace "Down by the diner, right across the street from the diner, there used to be a chair. It was the welcome chair for Union City because we were the chair capital of the world. As things started to go downhill a little bit, then we replaced that with this boat because we also made boats there. Then after they quit making boats there, then we put a little plaque there with a list of all the businesses in Union City. When the businesses started going under, now we've just got a thing that says, 'Welcome Union City.'" Maynard used to work in some of the factories that made those chairs. Now, he works the overnight shift in a potato chip factory for $10 an hour. On the side, he runs the Union City Historical Society Museum and DJs at the radio station — classic rock, mostly. Maynard's nearing 60, and while retirement should be on the horizon, "I'll probably have to hit the lottery to do that," he said. He's a Trump voter, "fiercely proud of it," because he believes Trump will bring jobs back to Union City. That decision, it turns out, puts him at odds with some of his family. Union City residents Brian Maynard and father Harold Maynard. Maitham Basha-Agha/Marketplace Brian's dad, Harold, 85, is one of them. "I'm a Republican, but I voted for Clinton because I looked at the people that were supporting Trump," Harold said. "The language that they use — the gutter language they use on the streets today, or in public or wherever, was exactly what Donald Trump was feeding with the people." Asked about Brian's work situation, he replied, "Making 10 bucks an hour is a little better than he had, isn't it?"  "Yeah, it's better than nothing," Brian said. Better than nothing, but Brian Maynard wants more for himself and his hometown. He wants what he was promised by Trump: a return back to the way they used to be. Tomorrow, our series "The Big Promise" airs live from Erie, Pennsylvania, at the Brewerie. If you're in town, come on by. 

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Ray Dalio is the founder of Bridgewater. Two years ago, Bridgewater surpassed Soros’ Quantum fund for the title of most profitable hedge fund of all time; returning over $46 billion since inception. In your author’s humble opinion, Ray Dalio is […] The post Lessons From A Trading Great: Ray Dalio appeared first on ValueWalk.

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